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Video project tips - iPad

This document is a work in progress. The purpose is to assist students with creating video projects using an iPad.

Tips and suggestions that are useful for computer video production are available at Video project tips.


SciTube

SciTube (2014, 2013) is an eighth grade Earth Science project where students are asked to create a five-minute video exploring a particular science topic. The recommended source for video media for this project is Discovery Education Streaming, which has videos that can be downloaded and imported into iMovie to edit and add narration. (Information on accessing Discovery Streaming is available at the help page Discovery Education.) Some of the tips below are useful for obtaining media from other sources.


Q & A for any video project


What D-E authorized iPad apps are useful for creating a video?

Depending on what you are trying to do and your preference, one app might work better than the other.  However, the following apps that might be useful are already on your school iPad or available in Self Service:

  • iMovie - primary video editing app
  • GarageBand - compose original music or create an audio remix 
  • Explain Everything - title pages, voice overs on images while annotating, animations
  • Documents (5) - download video and MP3 audio files (from sites offering downloads) to the iPad for use in other apps. This replaces Downloads Lite/Files HD.
  • Notabilty - drawings 
  • Keynote  - title pages, diagrams
  • Stop Motion Studio - stop motion animation
  • Tellagami - create a talking animation that uses your voice 
  • Chroma key/green screen apps such as (Green Screen by Do Ink) - See Mr. Campbell for app access. --  How to Use Green Screen Effects on iPads

There may be more apps available in Self Service that you might use for creating a video. If you find any in Self Service that you think should be added to this list, please email Mr. Campbell.


Where can I legitimately get media (images and music) to use in my project?

See Digital Media Sources


Where can I get more information on using iMovie on the iPad? 


How do I login into Discovery Education (previously known as United Streaming)?

Go to  google.discoveryeducation.com and log in using your DE Google account. More details are here.

How do I download audio and video to use in my project?

Typically, websites (e.g. Discovery Education) that give you permission to use their media provide download options or buttons.  However, the standard browsers such as Safari and Chrome on the iPad don't provide a way for you to save those audio and video files.  The app Documents 5 can be used to save audio and videos files on your iPad that you can then open in the iMovie app. Documents 5 is available in Self Service so you should install it from there to be sure to get the correct app. 


How to do I add an MP3 from the online free music service Jamendo to iMovie on the iPad using the Documents app?

Note: As of Spring 2016, Downloads Lite app has been replaced, by the publisher, with Files HD, which does not work reliability for audio and video downloads.  Documents (5), listed in Self Service, is recommended instead. (Documents 5 is used in the directions below.)

Using only an iPad, you can download free music as an MP3 from Jamendo.com and add it to an iPad iMovie project. The free app Documents by Readdle is required and can also be used to accomplish this for other sites that allow MP3 downloads such as Incompetech.

  1. In Safari, visit jamendo.com.
  2. Log in using your D-E Google account.
  3. Find a song by using Start on Jamendo Music (not Jamendo Licensing or Music for Videos). Tap the search tool to browse by genre, mood, or instruments. For example, enter #instrumental in the search box.
  4. To listen, tap the play triangle.
  5. To download for use in iMovie, tap the download icon.
  6. Tap the red "free download for personal use" button. A new page will open for playing the song. Copy the link to the song from the address bar at the top of that screen.
  7. Open the Documents app.
    • The Documents app is by Readdle (and is not the same Google Docs). The icon is white with a black D. It is called Documents 5 in the app store.
  8. Select Browser then paste the link to the song, which you just copied in Safari, into the address bar at the top and press Go.
  9. A Save File box will appear and allow you to change the name if you wish. Do NOT change or delete the .mp3 at the end of the name. Press Done to accept the name.
  10. MP3 file of the song will download and a gray box will appear (and quickly disaster) after the download is complete.
  11. After the download is complete, tap the hamburger menu (three horizontal lines) and select Documents.
  12. Tap the song you just downloaded and it will open and play. (You can pause it.)
  13. Tap the Share icon (upper-right corner) and select Open In.
  14. Select Copy to iMove.
  15. After iMove opens, select the iMovie project you are working on. The MP3 song will be added to the timeline and be available under Audio - Imported if you need to add it elsewhere.

How do I get video or MP3 audio files from a computer to my iPad?

Try uploading them from your computer to your D-E Google Drive account, which has unlimited storage space.  Then, on your iPad use Open In from the Google Drive iPad app to open the video into a different app such as iMovie or Explain Everything.



Copyright and Fair Use of Digital Media from Others

Almost everything you can find online is copyrighted. (More information about copyright is here.) As a student, you may include copyrighted material in school projects by following "Fair Use" Best Practices, which include:

  1. Use only a small portion of copyrighted works to create new materials.
    • While there is no legal rule for the quantity, some suggest no more than 10% of digital media such as a video or a song is appropriate.
  2. You may distribute/post your work digitally if your use of copyrighted materials is transformative.
    • Transformative use: Modifying existing media, putting it into a new context, and using it a way that is different from how it was originally intended.
  • An example of proper Fair Use: Taking a small portion of a video and recording a different soundtrack and narration in order to convey a different message than the original video.
  • An example of improper Fair Use: Using an entire song as a soundtrack for your video (unless its copyright explicitly allows for reuse).

Don't forget you still need to cite your sources even when used under Fair Use.

To avoid worrying about Fair Use, get media from websites that specialize in publishing public domain (free for any use) or Creative Commons licensed work intended for sharing. A few of those sites are listed in the section "Where can I legitimately get media (images and music) to use in my project?" above.

If you do use digital material under Fair Use, you should consider using the Fair Use Evaluator (click here) from the American Library Association to justify your use to your teacher and yourself.